Written by Rebel Not Taken
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Sunday, 10 July 2011

image for Nigerian News Of The World scam exposed
Hugh Jarse and Emma Royd in Lagos.

Thousands of innocent English people are being conned into paying subscriptions for a Sunday newspaper called 'The Nigerian News Of The World'.

The paper has been exposed as a complete scam and is being promoted by a pair of embittered journalists who have relocated to Lagos. Two of the writers have been named as Hugh Jarse and Emma Royd from Chiswick in London. Both are believed to be alcoholics.

Pensioners from Dorking and Bognor Regis are among the many victims to be duped by these cynical fraudsters.

"A lot of the stories are about witch doctors putting curses on goats in small villages in Nigeria", complained Doris Trellis, 88, from Bognor.

"There is no local news about Sussex GP's poisoning people and nicking their life savings" said the unhappy Doris.

Many football fans have also been hoodwinked into buying the bogus paper. They have now realised, too late, that all the sports' gossip is about Emmanuel Adebayor pocketing £140,000 a week (280,000 NGN) for being on 'gardening leave' in Manchester.

Eric Nonce, a retired Maths teacher from Dorking, has also lost out. He told us how he blew a week's pension betting on the 'Spot The Ball' competition.

"I had hundreds of attempts spotting the ball in a photograph of Emmanuel Adebayor taking a penalty, but the pitch was in Nigeria and the ball was spotted landing in Cameroon" said a disgruntled Mr Nonce.

Fraud Squad Officer Arthur Slaphead-Mason was sent to Lagos six months ago to intercept fake writers Hugh Jarse and Emma Royd.

But Slaphead-Mason's wife Edna, said she had not heard a dicky bird from the Littlehampton policeman and has revealed to next door neighbour Rita Plebb that "the dodgy old git is probably involved in the racket himself".

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